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A Must-See: The Lumina Foundation’s “A History of Federal Student Aid”

Have you seen The Lumina Foundation and the Institute for Higher Education Policy’s film series, Looking Back to Move Forward: A History of Federal Student Aid? The four-part series provides insight into the evolution of federal student aid over the last 60 years.

Pell Grants have helped millions of students from low-income families attend college. But you’ll be surprised to see the struggle that the program had to go through to become what it is today.

Celebrating 10 Years of College Results Online!

Ten years ago, we created College Results Online to challenge the conventional wisdom that colleges’ graduation rates were simply a function of the students they served. Since then, this online tool has shown us that colleges serving similar students often get very different results.

‘Moving on up’ Like George and Weezy Jefferson: A College Degree and the American Dream

The blog was originally posted on The Equity Line

 

If you work hard and follow the rules, you too can “move on up” from a working class neighborhood in Queens to a deluxe apartment in the skyline of Manhattan’s Eastside, just like The Jeffersons.

At least that’s how the story goes.

But findings from a new report show that story is unlikely

Student Stories: The Devastating Impact of Some For-Profits

The post and video below are from CNNMoney

Students across the country are shelling out tens of thousands of dollars for degrees that end up being completely worthless.

Students of Color Need a Strong Gainful Rule, According to New Analysis

It is a well-known fact that many for-profit colleges fail to live up to their end of the deal with students. These for-profits lure students into enrolling with the promise of landing a high-paying job after they graduate. But come graduation — or for the many who leave without finishing — all a lot of students are left with is a mountain of debt. Oftentimes for-profits’ primary interest is to bring in the federal financial aid dollars students receive — like those from Pell Grants, federal student loan dollars, and veterans benefits — while educating students becomes secondary or worse. This is particularly worrisome for African American and Latino students who make up 21 percent of total postsecondary enrollment, yet they represent 41 percent of students at for-profit institutions.

Many For-Profit College Companies Deliver Broken Promises and Failed Dreams

If you watch daytime or late-night TV, you’ve seen the slick, 30-second commercials that promise down-on-their-luck viewers a fairy godmother-like solution – a quick, affordable, college-level education that provides hands-on experience and positions students to land their dream job. If you want proof of the quality of these career education programs, the commercials continue, look no further than the myriad of success stories of their graduates.

Yesterday’s Boston Globe article, “For-profit colleges get harsh grades by former students: Graduates complain of onerous debt, unmet promises about careers,” paints a more realistic story of what actually happens to former students of these schools, such as:

Don’t Understate What Low-Income Students Pay for College

Recent news reports have implied that elite colleges are a bargain for low-income students — that the financial aid awarded to them reduces the total price to a manageable amount, even for our nation’s poorest students.

But these reports have missed one crucial point...

Where in the Pell Are They? U.Va. Can Be Selective Without Being Exclusive

High-achieving students from low-income backgrounds aren’t fictitious characters from the Game of Thrones HBO series; they exist — and in much larger numbers than many elite institutions would have you believe. Too many of these institutions rely on their selective admissions requirements to explain why so few low-income students enroll in their college.

In fact, at a symposium we co-hosted this month in Charlottesville, Va., a senior administrator at the University of Virginia used this excuse while attempting to explain why Pell Grant recipients make up only 12 percent of undergraduates, even though about 42 percent of 18- to 24-year-olds without a college degree in the Commonwealth are from low-income or working-class family backgrounds.

Continue to Put Pressure on the Department of Education for a Strong Gainful Rule

With the public comment period for the proposed “gainful employment” regulations long closed, we have time to look back at what we’ve accomplished and see what work is still to be done.

With the help of borrowers, students, parents, and advocates from around the country, tens of thousands of comments were submitted to the U.S. Department of Education urging them to issue a stronger final “gainful employment” rule.